PEP

PEP is an anti-HIV medication that is prescribed to a HIV negative person, within 72 hours of potential exposure to HIV. Ideally it should be started within 24 hours. It needs to be taken for 28 days. A&E departments are able to start PEP when the clinic is closed. Evidence suggests PEP may reduce the chances of HIV infection by approximately 80%.

You can walk into 56 Dean Street to request PEP without making an appointment.

PEP is actively recommended in these circumstances

 

If the partner was HIV positive and not on treatment

  • You had anal sex without a condom.
  • You were penetrated vaginally without a condom
  • You shared injecting needles

 

If you had a partner of unknown HIV status belonging to a group at high risk of HIV (e.g. Gay man or from Africa/ SE Asia)

  • You were penetrated anally without a condom
  • If you shared injecting needles

 

PEP is not recommended if

  • Your HIV positive partner has undetectable virus levels on treatment
  • Human bites
  • Another person’s semen gets in your eye
  • You had oral sex (Mouth to vagina/penis)

 

More detailed information is available here http://www.bashh.org/documents/PEPSE%202015%20guideline%20final_NICE.pdf

This questionnaire is designed for gay men

Click on the options below to see if we recommend PEP


    • The PARTNER study looked at the risk of HIV being passed on by an HIV positive person whose virus was suppressed on treatment. This is commonly referred to as ‘undetectable’. They monitored 10,000’s of people having condom-less anal sex. The study couldn’t find any cases where HIV was passed on. That’s why PEP is not recommended.
    • Oral sex (both sucking and being sucked), semen (cum) in the eye, and human bites would not change our advice.

    Start Again

    • Your risk of catching HIV is less than 1 in 1000.
    • Oral sex (both sucking and being sucked), semen (cum) in the eye, and human bites would not change our advice.
    • There is a rare exception where PEP might be considered. If you were sucking someone and there were breaks in the lining of your throat (e.g. Trauma from rough sex) AND the person told you that they had caught HIV in the last few weeks.

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    • If you haven’t been exposed to HIV you don’t need PEP.

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    • PEP is only useful if started within 72 hours of the last risk.

    Start Again

    • Your risk of catching HIV is less than 1 in 1000.
    • Oral sex (both sucking and being sucked), semen (cum) in the eye, and human bites would not change our advice.

    Start Again

    • Your risk of catching HIV is less than 1 in 1000.
    • It might be considered if you could see blood or if there was a visible break in the skin after anal sex without a condom (e.g. from trauma).
    • Oral sex (both sucking and being sucked), semen (cum) in the eye, and human bites would not change our advice.

    Start Again

    • Taking PEP would reduce your chance of HIV. Ideally this should be started within 24 hours. PEP is not recommended if more than 72 hours has passed since the last risk.
    • Go to any sexual health (GUM) clinic or A&E department and explain you need ‘HIV PEP’

    Start Again

    • Taking PEP would reduce your chance of HIV. Ideally this should be started within 24 hours. PEP is not recommended if more than 72 hours has passed since the last risk.
    • Go to any sexual health (GUM) clinic or A&E department and explain you need ‘HIV PEP’

    Start Again

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