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  • COVID-19 safety – Please wear a mask. Temp checked & hand gel on arrival
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  • OPENING TIMES: MON 8AM–7PM • TUE 8AM–7PM • WED 12PM–7PM • THUR 8AM–7PM • FRI 9AM–4PM • SAT 11AM–4PM • SUN CLOSED
  • |
  • COVID-19 safety – Please wear a mask. Temp checked & hand gel on arrival
  • |
  • OPENING TIMES: MON 8AM–7PM • TUE 8AM–7PM • WED 12PM–7PM • THUR 8AM–7PM • FRI 9AM–4PM • SAT 11AM–4PM • SUN CLOSED
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The goal you’ve chosen is to play more safely; there are several ways to do this.

Knowing the drugs, how they work, and how to use them as safely as possible is a good start.

One of the most common harms from chemsex is catching sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Knowing about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and condom use, as well as getting tested frequently, is one way to protect yourself from STIs, and to play more safely.

Drug-induced psychosis happens when we use mephedrone and/or crystal meth; some people are more prone to it than others, and it can be more likely to happen if you are sleep deprived, of if you inject. It might manifest as feelings of persecution, conspiracy theories, or feeling paranoid. People experiencing psychosis may have thoughts that are associated with technology, cults, or people wishing them harm, or may think that people are listening outside the door or whispering about them.

If you feel like this is happening to you, the best thing you can do is call the police or visit an A&E department. It’s not a crime to have drugs in your bloodstream – only in your possession – so presenting to A&E or the police won’t get you in trouble if you’re not carrying any drugs. This is the safest thing to do, whether you’re having psychosis, or in actual danger.

GHB and GBL are very dangerous when mixed with ketamine, alcohol or benzodiazepines (like valium). Overdose is very possible, and can be fatal. Measuring doses correctly and dosing at appropriate intervals is crucial. They can also be physically addictive, with unmanageable, even dangerous withdrawal symptoms. You can find more information on this here.

Tips for using chems safely:

  • Get screened for STIs regularly including HIV and hepatitis C.
  • Don’t let someone else inject you.
  • Play with someone you trust (if possible) as your judgment can be dramatically impaired on chems.
  • Don’t play for too long; paranoia and hallucinations can be common on your second day awake.
  • Never share needles or other injecting equipment
  • If you’re not sure how to inject safely, please seek some advice from a local drug support service. There are also some safer injecting tips online. There can be risks of infection and other harms when not done correctly.
  • If you’re HIV negative but are worried that you may have been infected during your last session, find out about PEP, a medicine that can help you stay protected if you take it within the first 72 hours after the possible infection occurred.
  • If you’re looking to spend your nights, weekends or free time in a different way, do a search for sports, social and recreational activities, especially those aimed at gay men.
  • Don’t play too regularly if you want to avoid depression and psychological dependence. Include some sober sex in your sex life, have some dates, and engage in non-sexual recreation and intimacy.

Click on the links below to find more information about mephedrone (Meph, MKat), crystal methamphetamine (Tina, Ice, Meth), GHB and GBL (G, Gina), including how to use these drugs more safely, tips for safer injecting, and information on GHB and GBL dosing.

Taking a break between “benders” can help your body recover, ensure you don’t lose interest in non-sexual social activities, and reassure yourself that you are in control of the drugs, not the other way around. The video below can help explain why, and how to play more safely.

Setting boundaries, around what you will & won’t do re Chems or Sex, or how frequently we “play”, can be helpful.

Another way to play more safely is to have a clear set of boundaries before getting high: a list of things you will do on chems, and things you absolutely won’t do on chems. This might include certain drugs, how long you stay awake for, what you’re prepared to do sexually (and what you’re not), things you’ll communicate online, people you’ll play with and people you won’t. It can be hard to stick to this when in the grip of a chem high, but having a list pre-prepared while you’re sober can increase your chances of making those safer choices when high.

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